From the Jody Kriss Blog: Review of the WTC Transportation Hub

With many successful development projects across NYC, Jody Kriss is no stranger to the city’s stunning architecture. Though Jody Kriss and East River Partners tend to focus on honoring the design of historic structures, their developments have one major thing in common with the new WTC Transportation Hub; mindfulness of modern elegance and opulence. But, did Santiago Calatrava’s Oculus deliver on expectations?

The Oculus Strayed from its Original Design

Calatrava, a seasoned architect from Spain, has a fantastic track record when it comes to designing transportation-related structures all over the globe. For many, rebuilding the WTC area has been a spiritual and emotional experience, and Calatrava intended to honor this with his initial concepts. Originally, the structure resembled a dove being released from a child’s hand and was expected to cost about $2.2 billion to create. Commissioned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, with input from the local police force and various other entities, Calatrava’s initial designs were repeatedly altered to address “security issues.” Back in 2005, Chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Anthony R. Coscia explained that the changes “were all done in a way that stayed faithful to the original vision,” but even then, New York Times reporter David W. Dunlap wasn’t buying it. “It may now evoke a slender stegosaurus more than it does a bird,” he wrote, and based on reactions from visitors to the completed structure, it seems he was spot on with his assessment.

Visitors are Divided on Opinion

The total building costs came to about $4 billion, which New York Times reporter Michael Kimmelman estimates is about twice the amount it took to see Grand Central Station come to fruition, when adjusting for inflation. He refers to Calatrava as a “one-trick pony,” and goes on to say “the Oculus reveals itself all at once from awkward, tongue-shaped balconies,” and adds “The trip downstairs becomes a letdown.” From bad to worse, he picks apart the Oculus, “In its scale, monotony of materials and color, preening formalism and disregard for the gritty urban fabric, the hub is the sort of object-building that might seem at home on the Washington Mall.”

Paul Goldberger of Vanity Fair provides a wholly different point of view, calling the Oculus “the exhilarating nave of a genuine people’s cathedral.” He believes that Calatrava’s design consists of “curving ribs of steel to make a space that is uplifting, full of light and movement, and capable of inspiring something that has been in particularly short supply at Ground Zero, which is hope.” It’s hard to believe that the two reporters are even discussing the same structure.

It seems as if Goldberger and Calatrava share the same sentiment: that this is a highly-unique and opulent structure, created expressly for the people of New York. Very few municipalities have invested in providing something so grand for average citizens. “This person who is coming to New York to work very hard, one day may be living in a very modest house and may also be working in a very modest job, but for me, this person is very important,” Calatrava explained in an interview with Architectural Digest. For him, the structure was about honoring hard-working people and showing them how important they are to the community, and inspiring hope with symbolism found throughout.

No matter where you stand on the matter, one thing is certain. The Oculus is a piece of art, open to interpretation and subjective to tastes. The debate over its beauty and message will linger on for generations.

Jody Kriss Guides: Obscure “Features” Found in NYC’s Historic Buildings

As a premier NYC developer, Jody Kriss visits a lot of New York’s older buildings to determine which ones have the best bones for luxury renovations. While the Big Apple is known for majestic skyscrapers and quaint brownstones, the fact that many of these structures have been in use for hundreds of years means that some seemingly obscure features can be found in the older abodes. Just as today’s iPhone would surely create raised eyebrows in the early 1900s, a lot of the “technology” of yesteryear boggles the minds of today’s homeowners. Of course, if you’re in the market for one of Jody Kriss’ luxury developments, you aren’t likely to come across any of these gems, but surely these “features” commonly found in NYC’s older buildings are things most of the modern world is happy to do without.

1) Interior Windows

Many of NYC’s older buildings have windows for seemingly no reason. They’ll commonly appear on interior walls of a home and may even be placed on a bedroom wall that faces a hallway or other interior room. While not great for privacy, the windows once served a valuable purpose. As tenement living took center stage in NYC, buildings became cramped and densely populated. This worsened the spread of serious illnesses, like tuberculosis. In 1901, city codes were rewritten so that all rooms would have some form of ventilation. Even though traditional windows that provide fresh air from the outside were more ideal, lawmakers put in a clause that allowed landlords to fulfill their legal obligations by installing interior windows between rooms. To this day, they’re also called “tuberculosis windows.”

2) Kitchen Baths

Occasionally, some NYC homes still sport bathtubs in the kitchen. This is a throwback from the same piece of legislation that spurred interior windows. The earliest structures were built before running water made its way into homes, so when the laws changed to stipulate that landlords had to provide running water, they’d make it simple and run a single line into the main living area or kitchen. In order to cut costs, people began adding bathtubs to their kitchens, just to take advantage of the plumbing. In 1929, additional legislation passed that stated “Every wash basin, bath, shower, sink and laundry tub shall be provided with an adequate supply of hot and cold water.” This further encouraged landlords to forego the additional work and expense of hosting bathtubs in the bathroom and the trend of kitchen baths continued for another 30 years or so.

3) Speaking Tubes

Anyone who has seen “The Boy” movie in theaters was no doubt left unsettled by the existence of listening devices in the walls. Believe it or not, these are real contraptions, installed in many older buildings across America. They’re called “speaking tubes” and were commonly used as a way to communicate with household staff prior to intercoms. Some homes also have them installed as a way to talk to visitors at the front door, perhaps from an upper floor landing.

4) Milk Doors

Many a renter has been left mind boggled by a small passage with a door, which is usually cut through an exterior wall near a service door. The spaces are large enough for a child to fit through, which doesn’t make a whole lot of sense in modern life where safety and security are concerns. These are generally called “milk doors” or “milk chutes,” and they were used as a depositary area for the milkman. Homeowners would leave their empty bottles inside to be picked up, and the milkman would replace them with fresh bottles. Sometimes, they were used for other types of deliveries, but it almost always related to food.

Most of these features were born from necessity of the time or were utilized to cut corners and costs when updating properties. Although you’re likely to find an intercom system in a project developed by Jody Kriss, it’ll be of the modern variety, and thankfully, all bathtubs are tucked away in bathrooms, which look more like private sanctuaries than family hubs. Not surprisingly, this tends to be preferred among today’s homebuyers.